Pirate’s Gold: Rigging, Scene Assembly, Animation

Rigging

In order to create an opening / close animation for the chest, I had to bind the pieces to a “digital skeleton,” creating a hierachy of joints that, although simple, meant that I could pose the model into a desired position. With only two different ‘limbs,’ the chest was relatively easy to rig. After adjusting the pivot point of the lid to the bottom of the hinge…

nice.png…allowing for the opening of the chest…nice.png…I went on to link the bottom of the chest onto a “control” object (basically allowing me control of the entire chest) and then the base to the lid. The result is a hierachy of joints in which the control object is the parent or “root joint,” with the remainder linked to it. In essence, you move the control object and everything else follows, whilst if you moved the lid, it would not have any influence on the other joints. That’s the rigging done!

Scene Assembly

The scene assembly was fairly straight forward, although in the beginning I made the mistake of trying to import multiple objects at once and ended up with a weird merged document that I could not decipher. After ditching the “shortcut” method, I imported the assets individually and set to work assembling the scene.

Although we are only given a few types of models, I chose to vary their size, angle and direction to create more visual interest. Even if they’re only copies of the same models, the variation means the scene isn’t as bland as it could be.

nice.png

I mainly wanted to centre the vegetation around the chest board, as it’s the focal point of interest and is likely to be where the camera is going to circle around.

Animation

The view I had for this project was a quirky, comedic animation so I tried to reflect that in the animation by adding lots of squash and stretch elements. Having certain elements drop from the sky and onto the board, namely the palm trees, allowed me to showcase the tool to its full effect. Because the trees varied in size and timing, I tried to vary the point of impact and the ripple effect, giving each tree its own individual animation, even if it was a little time consuming!

wow.png

Still of the palm trees entering the scene, with accompanying squash and stretch motions.

Rather than having the crabs drop from the sky and getting squashed (I know I’m not exactly going for realism, but it didn’t exactly feel right), I had them appear from below the scene and bounce back down. If I had left the grass surrounding the board alone before it actually opened, it would have probably looked a little odd, so I made the decision to have them “pop” up after the board opened in a similar fashion to the crabs.

prog.png

Progression of the crab entering animation, which was applied to all three crabs in the scene, though at varying intervals.

I additionally added some idle movements to the vegetation both on and around the perimetre of the board. I wanted to create an effect similar to “swaying” in the wind for the grass and palms – mainly to avoid a static-looking animation once they had finished entering the scene.

To add a comedic element like I mentioned before, I decided to have objects “squash” some of the idling crabs in the background whilst the camera focuses on one in particular (largely inspired by the entrance animations). The first crab, circling around the board, is first squashed by the chest, whilst the second is launched off the board by a starfish appearing beneath it, and the final one to be squashed by a shell after getting excited over the coins pouring out of the chest.

prog.png

R.I.P. little buddies…

When assembling the coin particle I ran into a ridiculous amount of problems when I was trying to edit it at home. Coins would only appear for a select few frames, wouldn’t appear at all, wouldn’t register as coins, but rather as “crosses,” would appear as multiple events in the particle viewer to the point where it confused me… (detailed below in screenshots) …just to name a few of the errors I ran into.

Untitled.pngCapturek.png

As I was becoming progressively more hindered by time constraints, my tweaking of the particle system (including redownloading the .zip file, restarting the program multiple times, reissuing the shape instance in the particle viewer, reordering the setting in the particle viewer, deleting the old files and bringing in new copies, messing around with the quantity multiplier – both the viewport and render settings, double-checking the timeline to make sure I wasn’t mistiming it, moving the position of the deflector, and double checking just about every other setting you could think of) I sent a .zip file to one of the lecturers containing all the assets and my scene. To my surprise, it worked perfectly on his device. With little time to waste, I assumed the problem was with my own laptop and just uploaded the .zip file to Google Drive to render at the university the next day.

Although I wasn’t terribly ambitious about the animations and didn’t see a progressive narrative (besides a crab ignoring his friends and getting excited over coins), I feel that it was a good introduction into animating in 3Ds Max.

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